Politics

Sad reason trolls are blaming fishermen for Sydney’s Little Bay shark attack


Fishermen who were accused by online trolls of luring in a great white shark with bait before it mauled a swimmer at a Sydney beach have been defended as a marine expert offers the real reason the sea creature attacked.  

British expat Simon Nellist, 35, became Sydney‘s first fatal shark attack victim in almost 60 years when he was mauled to death at Buchan Point, near Little Bay in the city’s east, on Wednesday afternoon. 

Nearby fishermen filmed the gruesome attack while beachgoers watched on in horror. Online trolls quickly swooped in to blame the fishermen for luring in the deadly creature with their bait.

Randwick City Council was forced to close its beaches – including Little Bay, Malabar, Maroubra, Coogee, Clovelly and La Perouse – on Thursday before reopening them on Friday.

Local angler Bruno said the fishermen were not to blame and that the shark was likely drawn in by a ‘perfect storm’ of reasons. 

British expat Simon Nellist, 35, became Sydney 's first fatal shark attack victim in almost 60 years when he was mauled to death at Buchan Point, near Little Bay in the city's east, on Wednesday afternoon

British expat Simon Nellist, 35, became Sydney ‘s first fatal shark attack victim in almost 60 years when he was mauled to death at Buchan Point, near Little Bay in the city’s east, on Wednesday afternoon

Shocked fishermen (pictured) who witnessed a shark fatally mauling a swimmer have been callously trolled online over their reaction to the tragedy. Above, the shark

A fisherman standing on the rocks metres away from the incident can be seen clasping his head64 with his hands as the shark circles in the water

Nearby fishermen filmed the gruesome attack while beachgoers watched on in horror 

‘The deceased was swimming in an extremely deep pocket of water more than 200meters away from the beach and general beachgoers, in a body of water well known for holding many species of baitfish year round and with that, natural predators, including sharks,’ he said.

‘I have seen numerous sharks hooked here over the years as it is natural haven for all types of marine life, given the ocean floor topography and its south facing aspect tucked inside prevailing oceanic currents.’ 

Bruno said the recent La Niña weather pattern had pushed warm water towards the beach, attracting masses of baitfish.

‘This in turn attracts larger fish and sharks up the food chain. It’s a natural, albeit fairly rare, cycle,’ he said.

‘I know of other sharks hooked in the eastern suburbs of Sydney in recent days by fellow anglers.

‘We need to respect the ocean and its many variables. The area of the attack is inherently risky for swimming and spearfishing, especially at present due to prevailing oceanic conditions. 

‘Anglers have fished this spot forever and their activities do not attract sharks.’

Recreational Fishing Alliance of NSW president Stan Konstantaras agreed the shark was likely drawn in by the abundance of ‘big king fish, bonito and tailor’ fishes that were known to lurk around the area.

Bond University Associate Professor of Environmental Science Dr Daryl McPhee said blaming fishermen and the beachgoers for the attack was not fair. 

‘The victim’s family and friends should be foremost in our minds,’ he told 7News.

‘Scapegoating of the witnesses who were at the scene must stop. They themselves are traumatised by what they have seen.’ 

British expat Simon Nellist with his fiance Jessie Ho. The couple planned to marry last year but were forced to push back the ceremony because of the pandemic

British expat Simon Nellist with his fiance Jessie Ho. The couple planned to marry last year but were forced to push back the ceremony because of the pandemic

Bruno said the recent La Niña weather pattern had pushed warm water towards the beach, attracting masses of baitfish (pictured, police at the scene following the shark attack)

Bruno said the recent La Niña weather pattern had pushed warm water towards the beach, attracting masses of baitfish (pictured, police at the scene following the shark attack)

An illustration shows how the shark pounced on the helpless victim less than half its size, before turning the ocean red with blood – sparking panic on the shore.

Authorities are not believed to be planning to kill the shark, and will instead chase the animal away from the mainland if it is picked up by drum lines set up at the scene. 

The frenzied attack took place only 150m away from the main beach, which was packed with dozens of swimmers, paddle boarders and rock fishermen.

The circumstances of the tragedy emerged as an animal welfare advocate claimed the shark responsible for Wednesday’s attack probably mistook its victim for a helpless seal. 

Lawrence Chlebeck, of Humane Society International, said the ferocious attack was incredibly rare.

He believes the shark probably mistook the swimmer – reportedly wearing a wetsuit – for a seal when it launched the attack. 

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‘It’s very unusual to see a shark attack a human like that,’ said Mr Chlebuck. ‘Normally a bite is not fatal.

‘Normally they bite something to figure out what it is. Once they realise it’s a person and not a normal prey item, they take off.

‘The vast majority of shark bites are a ‘one and done’ occurrence. This is a very unique, and unfortunately tragic, situation.’

It was the first fatal shark attack in Sydney in almost 60 years. Australia has averaged just 1.2 fatal attacks a year since the 70s, despite a spike last year, Mr Chlebuck said.

But he said most great white shark bites were juveniles.

‘They are still trying to figure out their changing diet as they switch from fish, as young sharks, to seals and marine mammals,’ he said. 

It comes as:  

  • A shark expert described the attack as ‘particularly nasty’ and of a kind only seen 10 to 12 times in the past 30 years 
  • Police announced beaches along Sydney’s eastern and southern coastlines are shut for 24 hours, including: Bronte, Tamarama, Bondi, Coogee, Clovelly, Sth Maroubra, Little Bay, Malabar/Long Bay, La Perouse, Wanda, Elouera, Nth Cronulla and Cronulla 
  • A man was escorted from the water at Little Bay by police after he was seen swimming on Thursday morning  
  • Surf lifesavers confirmed the shark disappeared despite surf life savers managing to scramble a helicopter within minutes of Wednesday’s brutal attack. ‘They didn’t identify or detect any shark in that area,’ said NSW Surf Life Saving CEO Steven Pearce 
  • NSW Surf Life Saving CEO Steven Pierce revealed tagged bull sharks are known to live not far from the scene of the attack  

‘To see this behaviour from something said to be four or five metres long is very unusual.’ 

He fears the nearby fishermen may have been using live bait and burley or throwing discarded fish guts into the sea, inadvertently luring the shark into shore.

‘Anything that puts blood in the water will attract sharks,’ he said. ‘I’m in no way apportioning blame, but it’s something we can look at when we try to make sense of these random rare occurrences.’ 

Angry locals took to social media hours after the mauling, saying fishing off the rocks would have attracted the apex predator.

‘Presumably baiting of this area would have attracted fish, so a shark could well be attracted too. Ghastly situation for the unsuspecting swimmer and rescue teams,’ one person fumed.

‘The fishing will have encouraged the shark closer to shore. The swimmer didn’t stand a chance,’ a third said.

A NSW Fisheries Patrol boat was out in the water throughout Thursday to search for the predator. Authorities are not believed to be considering killing the animal, and instead want to chase it out to into the ocean

A NSW Fisheries Patrol boat was out in the water throughout Thursday to search for the predator. Authorities are not believed to be considering killing the animal, and instead want to chase it out to into the ocean

Pictured is a sign at Little Bay Beach on Thursday notifying beachgoers how many deaths have been recorded at the beach spot

Pictured is a sign at Little Bay Beach on Thursday notifying beachgoers how many deaths have been recorded at the beach spot

But professional fisherman Joe Smythe told Daily Mail Australia Buchan Point is an ideal spot for sharks already and calls to ban recreational fishing were ‘hysteria’.

‘That location screams shark attacks, there’s a fish holding structure with the rocks and reef dropping off into deep water – and sharks patrol that territory.’

‘I was down there yesterday and there were birds in the area because of a school of bait fish.’

‘I don’t think fishing has anything to do with it, these attacks are usually quite random,’ Mr Smythe said.

‘It used to be overfishing was causing sharks to get more desperate and now it’s turned around the other way and fishing is attracting fish and attracting sharks.’

‘It’s hysteria, this person swam there every day for years. It underlines the randomness of shark attacks and people are just looking for something to blame.’

Local MP Michael Daley told ABC News Breakfast the victim wasn’t believed to be a local, but regularly swam at the bay, which is regarded as one of Sydney’s best kept secrets. 

Drum lines were deployed and an intensive drone and sea search launched for the killer shark, which disappeared into the sea within minutes of the attack.   

Some of the callous online commentary about the witnesses included: ‘Did anyone else notice the guy fishing that didn’t even take his line in or anything? Just kept fishing.’

Another said: ‘The video is disturbing, the fact someone was swimming while someone else is fishing on shore? This whole thing is disturbing.

Another person said they were shocked the witnesses were able to ‘just sit there and describe the attack. 

The footage shows the predator thrashing around in the ocean and dragging its victim underwater as the sea turned red with blood, while stunned fisherman watched on in horror.

Two police officers search the water's edge at Buchan Point near Little Bay Beach in Sydney on Thursday

Two police officers search the water’s edge at Buchan Point near Little Bay Beach in Sydney on Thursday

In the clip, the man recording the video can be heard yelling: ‘Someone just got eaten by a shark.

‘Big great white. That’s insane.’

The predator’s fin can be seen swerving through the waves as the water turns red and seagulls circle above.  

A stunned fisherman standing on the rocks, just metres from the shark, clasps his head with his hand as he turns towards the man filming. 

In another video posted online, fisherman can be heard screaming as the terrifying incident unfolds in front of them.

Surf rescue workers searched Little Bay Beach in Sydney's east for the shark that killed a swimmer as dawn broke on Thursday morning

Surf rescue workers searched Little Bay Beach in Sydney’s east for the shark that killed a swimmer as dawn broke on Thursday morning

Authorities have deployed drones to search the coastline for the shark responsible for the attack

Authorities have deployed drones to search the coastline for the shark responsible for the attack

‘Someone just got eaten by a shark. Oh man! Oh no! That’s insane. That’s a great white shark,’ one fisherman yells.

‘The person’s still there!

‘I just saw a four to five metre great white explode on the surface just here on a swimmer and it was like a car landing in the water.

‘F*** man, I heard a scream and the shark was just chomping on his body and the body was in half just off the rocks here.

‘It came back and swallowed parts of his body and that was it. It disappeared.’

Other frantic onlookers on the rocks can be heard swearing and screaming in horror.

One of the fisherman at the scene said there was nothing they could do to save the man, as it became immediately apparent his injuries were fatal. 

‘Out of no where, we heard ‘ahhh’, and then there was a big shark in the air – totally airborne – and it hit the guy very, very quick,’ he told reporters.

‘We couldn’t do anything about it.’ 

The death at Buchan Point, a popular spot for rock fishing and spearfishing between Little Bay and Malabar beaches, is Sydney’s first shark attack fatality since 1963. 

Emergency services rushed out to the scene in boats, helicopters, and jet skis, but the swimmer suffered 'catastrophic' injuries and could not be saved

Emergency services rushed out to the scene in boats, helicopters, and jet skis, but the swimmer suffered ‘catastrophic’ injuries and could not be saved

Beaches from for 24 hours in the wake of the attack. Pictured: Fishermen at Little Bay

 Beaches from for 24 hours in the wake of the attack. Pictured: Fishermen at Little Bay 

Emergency services workers and lifeguards rushed out to the scene in rescue helicopters, boats, and jet skis, in a frantic search to find the swimmer and the predator.   

SYDNEY BEACHES CLOSED ON THURSDAY 

Bronte, Tamarama, Bondi, Coogee, Clovelly, South Maroubra, Little Bay, Malabar/Long Bay, La Perouse, Wanda, Elouera, North Cronulla and Cronulla. 

‘They’re supposed to be saving people’s lives not pulling body parts from the water but they’re on duty, they’re always there to keep us safe, we are very grateful,’ he said.   

Lifeguards stepped up patrols on Thursday and police were also seen searching the shore near the scene of the attack and will continue doing so throughout the day. 

The tragedy has rocked the local community, with NSW Police at 10am announcing all 14 beaches from Bondi to Cronulla will be closed for 24 hours. 

They include Bronte, Tamarama, Bondi, Coogee, Clovelly, South Maroubra, Little Bay, Malabar/Long Bay, La Perouse, Wanda, Elouera, North Cronulla and Cronulla. 

NSW Surf Life Saving CEO Steven Pierce said the Department of Planning and Environment was setting up drum lines in an effort to keep the killer shark and any others away from the beach.

He said tagged bull sharks were known to the area, but that surf lifesavers have yet to find the predator despite getting a helicopter into the air and jet skis into the water in minutes. 

Authorities on jet skis at Little Bay on Thursday as the search for the killer great white shark continues

Authorities on jet skis at Little Bay on Thursday as the search for the killer great white shark continues 

A brave man entered the water at Little Bay on Thursday morning to go for a swim but was forced to get out of the water

A brave man entered the water at Little Bay on Thursday morning to go for a swim but was forced to get out of the water 

‘We need to ensure the beaches are cleared of danger to our best ability, so we’ll keep surveilling that area today, leading into the weekend we’ll have a high presence of water assets and will ensure the lifesaver helicopter will fly around the coast to have that extra presence,’ Mr Pierce told the Daily Telegraph.

The rescue chief said even a shark net would not have prevented the swimmer’s death, given the predator was so intent on attacking him.

‘I don’t think any form of shark netting would have prevented this attack, if a large shark is in the vicinity to attack someone,’ he said.

Bondi Rescue Lifeguards shared this photo of one of their staff putting up shark warning signs early on Thursday morning

Bondi Rescue Lifeguards shared this photo of one of their staff putting up shark warning signs early on Thursday morning

‘Nine out of 10 times when we do patrols we see sharks, and they’re often just swimming by… tragically this shark was intent on causing harm.’

Daily Mail Australia saw curious locals try to walk down to the beach early on Thursday morning but access to the shore was forbidden.

Parents with children and locals walking their dogs stood in shock as they looked out at the rocks where the man’s life was brutally taken.

One brave swimmer entered the water but was quickly approached by police on jet skis and ordered to get out.  

Randwick City Council Mayor Dylan Parker said the news was shocking.

‘I learnt the news after coming out of the ocean myself at a different beach – swimming in the ocean is our pastime out here and to hear somebody die like this is just absolutely horrifying,’ he said.

‘An attack like this in recent memory is unprecedented.’

Mayor Parker added that it was likely some swimmers would be reluctant to get back in the water.

‘As a passionate swimmer myself, it’s definitely given me pause but it’s something we will work through. It’s very rare but there’s always a risk, generally our coastline is safe however unfortunately tragedies do occur,’ he said.

Police officers and surf life saving workers are pictured near the scene at Little Bay Beach on Thursday morning

Police officers and surf life saving workers are pictured near the scene at Little Bay Beach on Thursday morning

NSW Police officers on the scene at Little Bay Beach on Thursday morning. Beaches across Sydney's east are closed after a swimmer was killed by a shark on Wednesday afternoon

NSW Police officers on the scene at Little Bay Beach on Thursday morning. Beaches across Sydney’s east are closed after a swimmer was killed by a shark on Wednesday afternoon

Buoys have been set up in the water around the scene of the fatal shark attack on Thursday

Buoys have been set up in the water around the scene of the fatal shark attack on Thursday

Agriculture Minister Dugald Sanders said while shark management in Australia was a ‘grey area’, drum lines are a proven solution.

‘I should point out this morning the fisheries guys have already been out to the location of the gutwrenching attack to put smart drum lines in,’ he told 2GB’s Ben Fordham.

‘Smart drum lines have proven to be really successful and also tagging sharks to know exactly where they are and using our smart shark app, along with monitoring with drones.’

Mr Daley said he was ‘horrified and shocked’ upon hearing the news.

‘I was deeply concerned for the family and sad for what happened. I’m really disappointed that a fatal attack as rare as it’s been has come to pass, it really spoils the coastline in a way,’ he said.

‘I think a lot of people will think twice before going in the water or won’t at all. For this to happen is shocking, sad and disappointing.

‘There’s a range of attitudes to things like this, there’s some that pass it off and swim fearlessly and there are others that wont go in the water because they’re scared. This will make everyone sit up and think about it, but hopefully it wont scare people away.’

But for Little Bay local Frances Ruisan, a shark attack won’t be stopping his daily swims.

The first fatal shark attack in Sydney since 1963 occurred at Buchan Point in Sydney's east

The first fatal shark attack in Sydney since 1963 occurred at Buchan Point in Sydney’s east

‘I’ve lived here for 40 years, it definitely won’t deter me,’ he told Daily Mail Australia.

He explained that the bay where swimmers commonly go is protected by rocks.

‘I would go for a swim this afternoon. I’m not too worried because it’s protected,’ he added.

At the time of the attack, Little Bay beach was packed with dozens of swimmers, paddle boarders and rock fishermen at the time of the attack.

They were alerted of the danger by the swimmer’s ear-piercing screams but could do nothing but watch on in shock as the monster shark ripped him into two and ‘swallow parts of his body’. 

‘Footage clearly shows a body, half a body being taken by a shark,’ a police officer told colleagues over a scanner when human remains were found an hour later.

The swimmer’s injuries were so catastrophic there was nothing paramedics could have done to save him, even if they got to him sooner.

Back on shore, dozens of fishermen and beachgoers were still reeling in shock as the desperate hunt for the predator continued.

Emergency services (pictured at the scene) launched a desperate search for the swimmer and found human remains an hour later

Emergency services (pictured at the scene) launched a desperate search for the swimmer and found human remains an hour later

The search for the great white shark will continue on Thursday, prompting the closure of at least 11 beaches

The search for the great white shark will continue on Thursday, prompting the closure of at least 11 beaches

Swimmers were ordered out of the water after the fatal shark attack at Little Bay Beach (scene pictured) on Wednesday afternoon, a popular spot for family swims

Swimmers were ordered out of the water after the fatal shark attack at Little Bay Beach (scene pictured) on Wednesday afternoon, a popular spot for family swims

‘Some guy was swimming and a shark came and attacked him vertically,’ fisherman Kris Linto told Nine News. 

‘We heard a yell and turned around it looked like a car had landed in the water, a big splash then the shark was chomping at the body and there was blood everywhere.

‘It was really bad.’

Another shaken witness recalled how the attack lasted just seconds.

‘He was yelling at first, and then when he went down there were so many splashes,’ he told the ABC.

‘The shark wouldn’t stop.

‘It’s very, very upsetting. He just went down for a swim, enjoying the day, but that shark took his life.’

The scenes were just as confronting for those involved in the frantic search for the swimmer, including jet skiers (pictured)

The scenes were just as confronting for those involved in the frantic search for the swimmer, including jet skiers (pictured)

Four ambulance road crews and a rescue helicopter with a critical care doctor and a critical care paramedic on board attended the scene in the hope of saving his life. 

‘Unfortunately this person had suffered catastrophic injuries and there wasn’t a lot paramedics could do when we arrived,’ NSW Ambulance Inspector Lucky Phrachanh said.

Police spent several hours at the scene interviewing shocked witnesses and later removed an SUV from the carpark at nearby Malabar Beach. 

Many Sydneysiders had hoped to spend Thursday in the ocean with temperatures to reach a balmy 31C.

Signage and barricades have been installed warning swimmers to stay out of the water.

Shocked witnesses (pictured speaking to police) heard the swimmer's screams in the water

Shocked witnesses (pictured speaking to police) heard the swimmer’s screams in the water

Little Bay Beach is regarded as one of Sydney’s undiscovered jewels and a ‘secret’ beach popular with locals.

‘The coast is our community’s backyard. Little Bay is normally such a calm, beautiful place enjoyed by families,’ Randwick mayor Dylan Parker said.

‘To lose someone to a shark attack like this is chilling. We are all in shock.

‘Our entire community’s hearts go out to the family of the victim.’

Many locals have vowed to avoid the water for a while in the wake of the tragedy.  

A local woman who regularly goes swimming around the area said the attack ‘made her think twice’.

‘So many locals go out swimming here, every day, and I’ve never seen a shark,’ she told Daily Mail Australia.

‘It’s terrifying’.

Fatal shark attacks in Australia since 2020

January 5, 2020: Diver Gary Johnson, 57, was killed by a great white shark while diving with his wife near Esperance in WA

April 6, 2020: Wildlife ranger Zachary Robba, 23, was mauled to death by a shark while swimming off the Great Barrier Reef in Queensland

June 7, 2020: Surfer Rob Pedretti, 60, was killed by a great white shark while he was boarding at Salt Beach near Kingscliff in far northern NSW

July 4 2020: Spearfisher Matthew Tratt, 36, was mauled to death by a suspected great white shark in a ‘provoked’ attack on Fraser Island in Queensland

July 11, 2020: Surfer Mani Hart-Deville, 15, was boarding when he was killed by a suspected great white shark at Wooli Beach, near Grafton on the NSW North Coast

September 8, 2020: Surfer Nick Slater, 46, was mauled to death by a suspected great white at Greenmount Beach on the Gold Coast

October 9, 2020: Father-of-two Andrew Sharpe was killed by a shark while surfing at Kelp Beds in Wylie Bay, near Esperance on WA’s south coast

November 22, 2020: Cable Beach, WA: Charles Cernobori, 59, who worked at a Cable Beach hotel was killed by a 4m suspected tiger shark while bodyboarding 2km north of the main tourist section

November 6, 2021: Paul Millachip, 57, was believed to have been taken by a shark while swimming at a beach in North Fremantle in Perth – with the attack witnessed by multiple people 

January 17, 2022: A swimmer is killed off Little Bay in Sydney’s east, believed to have been attacked by a four-metre-long great white 

 

The latest tragedy comes after the death of a father and son rock fishing at the same site two weeks ago.

Peter and his son Mahan, 10, were fishing on a rock face at Little Bay on the last day of the school holidays on January 31 when they were dragged into the water by a freak wave.

‘My husband and my son were just a few steps in front of me and now they are gone forever,’ Peter’s heartbroken wife told the Daily Telegraph.

‘I wish it was me instead of my little boy.

‘I don’t have the will to live.’

It’s the first fatal shark attack in Sydney since 1963 when actress Marcia Hathaway, 32, was mauled by while on a boating trip in Sugarloaf Bay in Middle Harbour.

The attack unfolded  around 10m from shore at Buchan Point (pictured), a popular spot for rock fishermen

The attack unfolded  around 10m from shore at Buchan Point (pictured), a popular spot for rock fishermen

Police (pictured) spent several hours at the scene on Wednesday night examining the scene and interviewing witnesses

Police (pictured) spent several hours at the scene on Wednesday night examining the scene and interviewing witnesses

She was attacked by a bull shark in just 30 inches (76cm) of water as her fiancé and friends watched on in horror.

‘I heard Marcia scream ‘oh dear’, and then she was dragged into deep water,’ her fiance Frederick Knight said at the time.

‘I started to run to her and saw the fin of a shark.

‘It seemed to have grabbed her on the calf of her right leg.

‘When I reached Marcia, it struck again and seized her on the thigh.

‘I started to kick the shark and beat it with my fists, most of the struggle is a blank but I remember at one time the shark was between my legs and I seemed to be straddling it.’

The critically injured actress was stretchered in an ambulance, which then broke down while navigating the steep track from the harbour.

She had stopped breathing by the time a second ambulance arrived.

Sydney's last shark attack claimed the life of television and radio actress Marcia Hathaway (pictured) in 1963 in Middle Harbour

Sydney’s last shark attack claimed the life of television and radio actress Marcia Hathaway (pictured) in 1963 in Middle Harbour

Jet skis were also used in the frantic search for swimmer before human remains were found

Jet skis were also used in the frantic search for swimmer before human remains were found

Police will liaise with the Department of Primary Industries (DPI) to investigate the circumstances surrounding the death of the swimmer.

‘DPI extends sincere condolences to the family and friends and first responders at this tragic time’, a spokeswoman told Daily Mail Australia.

‘DPI will continue to work with NSW Police and SLS NSW to monitor the area and provide any technical advice and resources if required, including deploying SMART drumlines in the area.’

The department has also advised a bull shark was detected 15km further north near Bondi an hour after the attack. It has not been confirmed the shark is linked to the attack.

A SharkSmart app provided by the New South Wales government alerts swimmers and surfers in real time when a shark is detected nearby.

Paramedics say there was nothing they could do as the swimmer suffered catastrophic injuries

Paramedics say there was nothing they could do as the swimmer suffered catastrophic injuries

How common are shark attacks in Australia? 

Australia’s coastline is more than 25,000km long and around 170 of the 400 species of sharks inhabit Australian waters. 

Shark attacks can occur at any time of year in Australia but are more common during the summer months from November to April when millions of people flock to the beaches during the warmer weather. 

In 2020, Australia reported 22 unprovoked shark attacks which made up 38 per cent of the worldwide total. Of these, eight were fatal and made up half of all fatal shark attacks worldwide in 2020. 

On average, 77 shark attacks occur worldwide each year, with the US usually reporting the highest number. In 2020, Florida represented 48 per cent of all US shark attacks. 

In 2021, the Florida Museum of Natural History’s investigated 137 alleged shark attacks worldwide.

The US made up most of the attacks, reporting 47, one of which proved fatal when a surfer was killed – possibly by a great white – on Christmas Eve off the central coast of California, authorities said. The state of Florida reported more than half of all attacks in the US in 2021 – with a total of 28. 

There were 12 recorded shark attacks in Australia in 2021 and figures show three of these proved fatal. 

Paul Millachip, 57, was believed to have been the last person killed during a shark attack in Australia in 2021 before today when he was taken by a shark while swimming at a beach in North Fremantle in Perth in November – with the attack witnessed by multiple people.

The fatal attack followed warnings that shark attacks are increasing.

In the 1990s there were 82 recorded shark attacks in Australia, which jumped to 161 in the following decade.

From 2010 to 2020 there were 220 and in 2021 there were three deadly attacks reported in Australia.

Bond’s University researcher Dr Daryl McPhee said the rise in attacks worldwide was down to a number of factors including more people being on the water doing activities, in more remote locations, and also warmer oceans are forcing shark and their food supply to different areas.

‘There is a long term trend of an increasing number of shark bites in Australia and overseas,’ Dr McPhee told The Project.

‘Sharks are part of the marine environment and if we could track where every shark was you would find there would be a large shark on most popular beaches most days of the year.’

‘So we need to find ways to co-exist.’

Professor Callum Brown from Macquarie University said despite the increase in shark attacks they are still exceptionally rare.

He added that old school methods of shark control such as nets, drum lines, and culls were being replaced with newer methods which are potentially more accurate.

One such method is to deploy drones which scan the water and send images to an artificial intelligence computer which can accurately spot sharks.

There are also personal deterrents which work by emitting an electrical pulse but these have the be used within metres from a shark to be effective.

And finally there are camouflage wetsuit and surfboard decals which can prevent surfers from appearing like seals to hungry sharks.

‘Our fear is really, it’s driven by guts. Not really by any data or any sort of realistic estimate of what the actual risk is. You should be more scared of getting in your car.’ he said. 



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